Bread Dipping Appetizer

Bread Dipping Appetizer

Bread Dipping Party snacks

Thursday, March 20th, 2008 8:21pm

bread dipping gift setBread Dipping as an appetizer or companion to the meal can be a gourmet delight.

When preparing for parties, consider serving Italian bread dipping as an appetizer. Present your selection of dipping sauces with a variety of bread and fresh vegetables and let your guests enjoy. As hors d’oeuvres the bread dipping dish is an excellent choice. Or, if the occasion is more formal and you are having guests to dinner you can use your dipping sauces for all the savory elements of your meal, and you might treat your meat to a dipping sauce marinade. You can set out as many dipping sauces as you like for your guests to try. A novel idea you might like to try is to invite guests to bring a dipping sauce that each of them has created so that everyone has a chance to try a different recipe.

As long as you always have a good quality bottle of extra virgin olive oil you can create any bread dipping sauces that you like. But remember, if you are planning to make bread dipping sauces, to make sure that the quality of your olive oil is superior. If you like this dish then it is a good idea to always have a bottle of good extra virgin olive oil as one of your stock ingredients. You never know when you will want to create a fast appetizer and it makes sense to have a bottle handy.

If you are looking for a snack for yourself or your family, planning a party, or creating an appetizer for unexpected guests remember your bread dipping dishes for a fast, flavorsome, healthy alternative. It cannot be more simple or convenient and it’s bound to be one dish that you recreate many times over.

bread dipping, dipping party snacks

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Oil dipping with bread appetizer

Monday, June 16th, 2008 6:34pm

oil dipping gift setOil dipping appetizer for bread is the perfect addition to any pasta meal. It is advisable to adjust all seasonings to your taste. Serve with Italian flat bread, soft Italian bread sticks, or even a fresh baked French bread loaf. For oil dipping, soft bread is ideal, although some oil dipping variations encourage toasting the bread before using. When red ripe tomatoes are in season, add chopped or fresh sliced tomatoes to your oil dipping appetizer. The same goes with fresh basil leaves torn into small pieces and added to the oil dipping mixture.

Oil Dipping Variations

Ingredients
1 Tablespoon garlic clove, peeled and pressed through a garlic press
1 tsp fresh Basil leaves
1 tsp Rosemary dried
1 tsp Oregano dried
1 1/2 Tablespoon Parsley dried
Sea salt
Dash of black peppercorns fresh ground
Add crushed red pepper to taste

Directions
Whisk together all ingredients completely. Place a teaspoon on a small dipping dish, drizzle well with gourmet quality Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Taste with an Italian bread slice, you may want to adjust the seasonings to your own palate. To serve, place a teaspoon of the mixture on a dipping dish, add the oil and blended herbs when dipping with bread. Add additional oil until herbs on plate are consumed.

Oil Dipping Recipe

Ingredients
1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, wash, pat dry leaves, then chop
4 cloves garlic cloves, peeled and pressed through a garlic press
1/8 teaspoon fresh ground black pepper

Directions
Pour olive oil into a dipping dish. Add chopped basil leaves, crushed garlic and ground pepper.  Whisk together evenly. Serve with fresh baked warm Italian bread. Use quality ingredients for best results, especially extra virgin olive oil, fresh basil and garlic. Add additional garlic for those who are garlic lovers.

Oil Dipping with Italian Bread

Ingredients
2 Tablespoons Cruets Gourmet Italian Bread Dipping Herbs and Spices
Grated Parmesan cheese, to taste
4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Directions
Place 2 T, Cruets Gourmet Italian Bread Dipping Herbs and Spices in dipping dish. Add water to cover the herbs. Let stand for 10 minutes. Drain Herbs. Pour olive oil over spices to cover. Stir to blend. Sprinkle grated Parmesan cheese over the herbs and spices. Serve as a dipping sauce with your favorite crusty bread. Makes 2 servings

Variation: add a drizzle of aged balsamic vinegar, add small torn pieces of fresh basil leaves

oil dipping, oil dipping recipe, oil dipping sauce, oil dipping bread 

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Bread Dipping Appetizer

Thursday, February 21st, 2008 9:40pm

Italian Bread Dipping Oil With Gourmet Dipping Dishes

Makes 18-20 servings

1/4 cup aged balsamic vinegar, Italian Masserie Balsamic Vinegar
3/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, use Italian or Spanish olive oil
Parmesan cheese, freshly grated. Try to find a Parmigiano-Reggiano from Italy
1/4 cup grated Asiago cheese
3 cloves of fresh garlic, pressed through a garlic press
A pinch of fresh ground peppercorns, black, white, red (optional)
1 loaf Italian bread
Assorted appetizer crackers

Grate the Asaigo cheese. Add in a mixing bowl all ingredients except Balsamic Vinegar. Add Parmigiano cheese, and grated Asaigo cheese as well. Mix with a fork. Last, drizzle balsamic vinegar over the dip and apply to bread or crackers. Garnish with a dash of fresh ground pepper if desired

 

Bread Dipping Companion, Roasted Garlic Cloves With Olive Oil

Thursday, February 21st, 2008 4:35pm

 

Roasted Garlic Cloves Recipe

 

Ingredients:

  • 1 head garlic
  • 1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil

 

Method:

Preheat the oven to 375F. Remove excess paper peeling from the head of garlic, but leave the garlic head intact. Cut the top (the pointed end) off the head of garlic. Place the head of garlic on a square piece of foil large enough to wrap the garlic in, for easy cleanup.  Drizzle extra virgin olive oil over the garlic cloves. Wrap the garlic head until completely enclosed within the foil. Bake in a preheated oven at 375 for about 40 minutes, until the garlic is completely soft and lightly browned. Allow to cool just enough to handle the garlic.

To serve, separate the head into individual cloves. Allow your guest to squeeze out the softened garlic as needed. Roasted garlic is a great spread on lightly toasted pieces of Italian bread or baguette. Offer the roasted cloves in one small dish and a high-quality extra virgin olive oil in another. Diner guests can dip the bread in olive oil, then spread a roasted clove of garlic on it. You can also add roasted garlic cloves to whipped or mashed potatoes for garlic mashed potatoes.

Easy Bread Dip Recipe With Herbs And Spices Served With Bread Dipping Dishes

Saturday, March 01st, 2008 5:50pm

Here is a quick, easy, and healthy recipes with dried herbs and spices and dipping dishes for olive oil bread dipping:

  • ¼ teaspoon of each of the following:
    oregano, basil, sun-dried tomatoes
  • ½ cup of Spanish extra virgin olive oil
    Ground black pepper to season
  • 1 loaf of either Ciabatta, Focaccia or French baguette, sliced on the diagonal, about 1” thick 

Method:

Rehydrate the herbs and sundried tomatoes by covering with water for 20 minutes. When the herbs and tomatoes are drained add to you extra virgin oil and add a touch of black pepper to taste. The dip recipe is complete and can be served in individual portions for each guest or in one bowl to share.

 

Italian Bread Dipping

Thursday, February 21st, 2008 9:37pm

Italian cooking can be described in an uncomplicated description as; ‘a love of simple foods prepared with care, and with fresh baked bread of course.’ Italian cuisine combines basic ingredients in a delicious way which features fresh fruits, vegetables, poultry, fish, pasta, breads and spices, together with olive oil.

Italian culinary traditions were developed as the building blocks of the Mediterranean cuisine, some refer to it as the Mediterranean Diet, but it is much more than a fad, it’s a way of life in Italy. Olive oil is an integral part of Italian cooking. Olive oil is always present on the table and is added to soups, sauces, pastas, and is drizzled from an olive oil cruet over vegetables and salads. Extra virgin olive oil is served as a dip with fresh bread and balsamic vinegar.

Bread is considered as a fundamental in the Italian cuisine. It may appear as the most simple, but it is an important component of Italian food and cooking. Bread is in the midst of every meal. Italian bread is used in a variety of ways, bread dipped in fresh herbs and spices, drizzled with extra virgin olive oil, bread for stuffing, bread for bread crumbs, or toasted bread for garlic and foccacia bread.

A long baguette with sesame seeds dusted over the top is regarded as a French Loaf. It is one of many favorite Italian breads. In Sicily the round panelle bread has a real brick oven taste to it as is also favored. It can be hard and crusty on the outside, but firm but soft on the inside, ideal for soups and oil dipping.

There is something unmistakably delicious about fresh bread dipped in extra virgin olive oil and spices. It is a great snack and appetizer. Place a bit of effort in selecting a quality fresh baked bread. A Supermarket “Italian Bread” that is white and, spongy soft, is neither appetizing or a good representation of what real bread should be. Some bakeries will offer fresh baked bread from authentic Old Country recipes. Of course, it’s all a personal preference and there are many types of specialty bread to choose from, such as Baguette, French, Panelle, Ciabata, or the Tuscan bread. 

bread dipping, Italian bread dipping

 

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Spinach Parmesan Frittata With Olive Oil

Monday, June 02nd, 2014 12:47pm

A frittata is similar to an omelet, but more like a Spanish tortilla, because it is served flat and not rolled. It is also made with ingredients at room temperature and cooked very slowly over low heat, and then it is placed under the broiler until it is hard. The more fresher the spinach is, the better. When sliced into thin wedges, or used as a sandwich filling, this frittata always cooled to room temperature before eating makes perfect snack, luncheon, or picnic fare.

 

  • Fine sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  •  Three oz fresh spinach leaves, washed and finely sliced
  • Six eggs
  • Freshly grated nutmeg to taste
  • Four oz freshly grated, Italian cheese
  • One tbs extra virgin olive oil

 

 

1. Preheat the oven broiler.

2. Crack the eggs into a large bowl and beat lightly with a fork. Add the spinach, pepper and salt, and nutmeg, as well as only half of the cheese, and lightly stir to combine the ingredients.

3. In a nine inch ovenproof omelet pan or skillet, heat the oil over moderate heat, swirling the pan to coat the bottom and sides evenly. When the oil is hot but not smoking, add the frittata mixture. Reduce the heat to low and cook slowly, stirring the top two-thirds of the mixture (leaving the bottom part to set, so it doesn’t stick) until the eggs have formed small curds and the frittata is brown on the bottom and almost firm in the center, about four minutes. The top should still be very soft. With a spatula, lightly loosen the frittata from the edges of the pan, to prevent sticking later on. Sprinkle with the remaining cheese.

4. Transfer the pan to the broiler, placing it about five inches from the heat, so that the frittata cooks without burning. Broil until the frittata browns lightly on top and becomes puffy and firm, about two minutes. (Watch carefully: A minute can make the difference between a golden-brown frittata and one that’s overcooked.) Remove the frittata from the broiler and let cool in the pan for two minutes. Place a large flat plate over the top of the pan and invert the frittata onto it. Let the frittata cool to room temperature.

5. To serve, cut into wedges and serve with a salad or as a sandwich filling.

Extra Virgin Olive Oil On Penne Rigate Pasta

Tuesday, April 01st, 2014 2:43pm

The estimated preparation time is a half hour and accommodates four servings

• Half of cup of olive oil
• One clove of garlic
• One pound penne rigate
• One pound shredded high quality mozzarella
• One tiny pinch dried oregano
• Pepper
• Salt
• Three tablespoons of chopped fresh basil
• Two oversized tomatoes

Begin by crushing the tomatoes. Use a pot to boil six quarts of water combined with one tablespoon of olive oil and salt. To obtain a dense mixture, you will have to add the penne and cook the resulted mixture up to nine minutes. To save time, try to prepare the sauce while the pasta is cooking. Use a medium-sized skillet to heat up the remaining olive oil. Then add the chosen amount of garlic and sauté it until you obtain a color similar to gold. Continue sautéing while adding the preferred amount of pepper and salt. During the process, add the crushed tomatoes and the two tablespoons of fresh basil. You will have to use half of the total quantity of mozzarella to skillet and keep it warm. The next step will be to mix the pasta with the obtain sauce and the other half of mozzarella. Don’t serve until you sprinkle the pasta with oregano.

Not All Dietary Fat Can Increase The Risk Of Chronic Diseases, Especially Olive Oil In The Mediterranean Diet

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014 1:18am

We all live with the perception that if we eat fat, we will totally ruin our health and increase the risk of developing various diseases. Practically every individual considers that a healthy meal should contain few or zero amounts of fat. However, there are some aspects that can contradict this perception. During the 1950’s, the Mediterranean diet used in the Greek Island of Crete produced the same fat consumption as in America, but the heart disease and other chronic disease rates were incredibly low. During this period of time, the Cretans were considered one of the civilizations with the longest lifespan on Earth. How can this be possible considering that their Mediterranean diet was full of fat?

The secret may be hidden in the incredible attributes of olive oil, since Cretans consumed from 3 to 5 ounces of olive oil each and every day, according to Ancel Keys. The famous researcher also pointed that Cretans used olive oil in practically every recipe; they even soaked the bread in olive oil. Instead of having breakfast, some Cretans simply drank a wineglass full of olive oil. Since most of the health problems that have affected the Americans during the 1950’s and 1960’s were associated with too much fat consumption, why weren`t the Cretans displaying the same symptoms?

We can`t say that Cretans were an exception to this rule since other countries have displayed the same results. People from the Mediterranean parts of Italy, Spain, and France consumed the same amounts of fat calories as the Cretans, and the heath disease rates were still surprisingly low. However, the Mediterranean diet could not be matched by any other diet from other countries. For example, in Finland, coronary heart disease was really popular amongst those who used to consume high quantities of fat. Moreover, Finland included the shortest life spans compared to any other European country.

Ancel Keys started a research to discover why coronary heart disease is so frequent in this country, so he compared the overweight American men with middle-aged men from Finland. The results confirmed the fact that Finnish men contained higher levels of cholesterol in their blood.

The dietary surveys that followed Keys’s research have proved the fact that Finnish people consume meals that contain high levels of saturated fat. Butter, rich milk, cheese and other similar foods that are rich in saturated fat were preferred by Finnish men.

Following diets that were very low in fat helped the patients to decrease the high blood cholesterol levels within one week. The same studies have also revealed the act that, from all the different types of fatty acids (saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated), the saturated fatty acids increased the blood cholesterol levels the most. Therefore, we can conclude the fact that coronary heart disease and other chronic diseases can be triggered only by a particular type of dietary fat, not all fat in general.

The Benefits Of The Healthy Mediterranean Diet With EVOO

Friday, February 28th, 2014 5:56am

Can the Mediterranean diet help lose weight?

Without a doubt, the Mediterranean diet and lifestyle can aid in weight-loss. The traditional Mediterranean diet has a low-fat and high-fiber content with a large array of vitamins, minerals, photochemicals, and other key nutrients vital to a healthy body. The most successful weight-loss plans that are also the most sustainable in the long run promote the consumption of minimally processed foods and a decrease in processed foods. Minimally processed foods include vegetables, fruit, and whole grains. Produce should be bought locally for increased consumption of vital nutrients that often deplete with age.  Processed foods are often loaded with sugar, salt, and saturated fat. EVOO, also known as extra virgin olive oil, is a major part of the healthy diet.

Design your meals to include the main food groups, with the emphasis of the meal on produce. Meat should only be eaten on occasion and in small proportion. Have the main course focus on plant sources of protein, such as beans, legumes, and whole grains.  Nut, meat, and dairy consumption should be limited and when consumed, of the low-fat variety.  Look for reputable producers, such as local farmers, for better quality and less chemicals.

The Mediterranean diet is compatible with any good health and maintenance goal. Single portions are must be observed. While diet is certainly a major factor in weight-loss, it cannot help you achieve that healthy figure alone. Moderate activity should be added as well, such as an after dinner walk. Follow these tips, and you should be able to lose weight at a sensible rate of one to two pounds per week.

 

How does one switch to a Mediterranean diet and lifestyle without sudden drastic measures?

Switching to a Mediterranean style of eating is simple and delicious. Start slowly by incorporating ingredients such as olive oil with butter into the dishes you are already preparing. Cook meals such as sautéed vegetables, soups, and pastas and add a small drizzle of olive oil before serving. This method can even be employed when baking. The olive oil has a distinct flavor which evaporates during the cooking process. However, if you can still detect a slight taste, an alternative is the milder tasting canola oil.

Get in the habit of removing meat and butter or margarine as part of your daily dinner from the table. Meat should switch positions from main course to side dish at meals. Think of meat as flavoring, and use it as such.   A large number of Mediterranean recipes exempt meat completely, but are still delicious and nutritious.  Legumes, nuts, and seeds are all excellent sources of plant-based protein. This switch will prove to not only be healthful, but economical as well.

Stock up on whole grain pastas and breads, legumes, canned produce, and in-season produce.  Visit your local farmer’s markets, produce stands, or locally sourced grocery stores as a great way to support your community and self.  These outlets also often have fresher and less chemically exposed produce that is also in-season. Remember as you shop the Mediterranean diet rules-of-thumb: quality over quantity, fresh over preserved, and whole over processed.

For dessert, skip high-fat and high-sugar fare. Though famous Mediterranean deserts are often extravagant, they are reserved for special occasions and are not meant to be consumed nightly. Rather, choose fruit as a healthful and naturally sweet alternative. If fresh fruit is not quite sweet enough to save your sweet tooth, dried fruit is still healthful and often sweeter than its former self. Dried figs, dates, or raisins are all excellent and recommended choices.

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